Georgia

1 Recognition of the Genocide

1.1 Recognition, official texts

According to the OSCE-ODIHR, report, the Holocaust is defined as "the massive destruction of Jews during the German Nazi regime in 1939-1945. The Ministry of Education and Science added that other victim groups are briefly mentioned” (See “Education on the Holocaust and on Anti-Semitism: An Overview and Analysis of Educational Approaches”, page 84).

1.2 Data (camps locations, Remembrance places, measures etc.)

At present, there is no distinctive Holocaust museum or Holocaust Memorial Day in Georgia. Holocaust victims are included in commemorations of those who died in World War I and World War II. (See “Education on the Holocaust and on Anti-Semitism: An Overview and Analysis of Educational Approaches”, page 84).

Victory Day was commemorated in Georgia on 9th May 2015. The event marked the 70th anniversary of the formal surrender of Nazi Germany to the Soviet Union in Berlin in May 1945. Georgian veterans and their families gathered at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Vake Park in Tbilisi to honour those killed in the war years. Around 300 000 Georgians lost their lives in World War II.

1.3 Specialised institution, commission, research centre etc., dealing with this issue

According to the available information, there is no specialised institution, commission or research centre specifically dealing with the issue of the Genocide of the Roma.

Marine Solomonishvili, president
19 Nishnianidze str
0105 Tbilisi
Georgia
Tel: 99532 2985896
Email: leasol@hotmail.com
 

Religious Congregation of Jews of Georgia

1.4 Official initiatives (campaigns, actions, projects, commemoration days, museums)

As per OSCE report “Holocaust Memorial Days in the OSCE Region: An overview of governmental practices”, page 46, Georgia has not designated a special day of commemoration for the victims of the Holocaust. Holocaust victims are included in commemorations of those who died in World War II.

On 27th January 2013, the Council for Ethnic and Religious Minorities, within the Ombudsman Office, together with the Jewish community, organised an event to commemorate the Holocaust. This memorial ceremony focused on those who risked their own lives to save tens of thousands of Jews, Roma and Sinti and others from near certain death under the Nazi regime during World War II in Europe. An exhibition of the artwork of Marine Solomonishvili, president of the International Council of Jewish Women in Georgia, on theme of Holocaust was inaugurated in the framework of the commemoration event. The author also introduced a film about the painters of the Holocaust.

2 Teaching about the Genocide of the Roma

2.1 Inclusion of the topic in the school curriculum

The subject of the Holocaust is included in history, literature, and German-language courses. Students encounter the subject for the first time at the ages of 9 to 10 in a course on the history of religion and then at the ages of 13 to 14 in a course on world history. (See OSCE report “Education on the Holocaust and on Anti-Semitism: An Overview and Analysis of Educational Approaches”, page 84)

2.2 Inclusion of the topic in the school textbooks

History textbooks for secondary schools allocate approximately two pages for the subject of the Holocaust. (See OSCE report “Education on the Holocaust and on Anti-Semitism: An Overview and Analysis of Educational Approaches”, page 84)

2.3 Training of teachers and education professionals

According to the OSCE Report (“Education on the Holocaust and on Anti-Semitism: An Overview and Analysis of Educational Approaches”, page 53): “Armenia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Moldova are an example of just how successful international support can be. In 2003-2004, within the project ‘Tolerance Lessons of the Holocaust’, the Euro-Asian Jewish Congress trained teachers from the above-mentioned countries on how to teach about the Holocaust. Experts from Moscow, Kyiv, and Bishkek delivered lectures and headed workshops focusing on methods for teaching about tolerance and the Holocaust. The teachers also received didactic materials.”

In 2002, Georgian teachers participated in an educational and methodological seminar called “Tolerance-Lessons of the Holocaust” as part of an international programme organised by the Euro-Asian Jewish Congress. (See OSCE report “Education on the Holocaust and on Anti-Semitism: An Overview and Analysis of Educational Approaches”, page 84)

2.4 Particular activities undertaken at the level of education institutions

Standards of instruction on history and civics refer to the Holocaust. (See OSCE report “Education on the Holocaust and on Anti-Semitism: An Overview and Analysis of Educational Approaches”, page 84)

2.5 Remembrance day

According to the available information, Georgia has not designated a special day of commemoration for the victims of the Holocaust.

3 Official contacts and resource persons

3.1 Responsible person in the Ministry of Education

According to the available information, there is no designated responsible person in the Ministry of Education and Science

Dimitri Uznadze N 52
0102 Tbilisi
Telephone: (995 32 2) 200 220
E-mail: pr@mes.gov.ge

3.2 Resource persons - list of experts and historians

Marine Solomonishvili, president of the LEA - Jewish Women's Organization of Georgia

4 Initiatives of the civil society

4.1 Relevant projects having a real impact on the people and/or the wide public

On 2nd August 2015, LEA - Jewish Women's Organization in Tbilisi, Georgia joint many European civil society organisation to mark Roma Holocaust Memorial Day by sending the statement of solidarity to the European Roma and Traveller Forum who called for a moment of silence on 2nd August, at noon, to mark the "Pharrajimos" or Roma Holocaust.

5 Point of view of the Roma community - including survivors' testimonies

Union of Roma from Kakheti “Roma”, together with the European Centre for Minority Issues, deals with daily challenges faced by the Roma population in Georgia: access to education, health care, housing and registering as citizens in order to get an ID. No information if Roma population is taught about Holocaust or Roma Genocide.