Publications of International Organizations

Training materials / teaching materials

Keen E. (2014) Right to Remember- A handbook for Education with Young People on the Roma Genocide. Strasbourg, Council of Europe Publishing.

Factsheets on Roma History, within the framework of the Project “Education of Roma Children in Europe”, available on line in Romani, English, French and German:

Wogg, M. et al. (eds.). “5.0. Holocaust”
Baumgartner, G. “5.1. Concentration camps”
Boursier, G. “5.2. The Nazi Period in Italy”
Hubert, M.-C. “5.3. Internment in France 1940-1946”
Zimmermann, M. “5.4. The Nazi Period in the Baltic States”
Ionescu, V. “5.5. Deportations from Romania”
Baumgartner, G. “6.0. The Situation of Concentration Camp Survivors”

Council of Europe (ed.). (2009). Le témoignage du survivant en classe. [Available only in French]

Council of Europe (ed.). Teaching Remembrance. Education for the Prevention of crimes against Humanity.

Lecomte, J.-M. (2001). Teaching about the Holocaust in the 21st Century. Strasbourg: Council of Europe Publishing.[There are translations into French, Italian and Portuguese].

Teacher training

The project “Teaching remembrance - Education for the prevention of crimes against humanity” offers seminars about the Holocaust, including the Genocide of the Roma. For instance, the "European Seminar, 'Teaching Remembrance': Budapest, 16-17 April 2004".

The Pestalozzi Programme regularly organises different workshops and seminars on the topic of the Holocaust, including the Genocide of the Roma.

The project "Learning and teaching about the history of Europe in the 20th century" organized in 2000 two training programmes for educational staff, which included the Genocide of the Roma: "Teaching about the Holocaust" (Vilnius, Lithuania, 1-6 April 2000) and “Teaching about the Holocaust and the History of Genocide in the 21st Century”(Donaueschingen, Germany, 6-10 November 2000).

Cultural activities

The Council of Europe launched the Route of the Roma Culture and Heritage in 2009. The objective of the Route of Roma Culture and Heritage is to increase the knowledge of people in Europe about Roma history, culture, values and lifestyle, to encourage the contribution of Roma to Europe’s cultural life and diversity and ultimately contribute to giving a positive value to an image of Roma which are, more often than not, perceived in a negative and stereotyped way.

To achieve this, the Cultural Route has first developed a network of organisations (associations, museums, documentation and cultural centres, art and education institutions, festivals, etc.;) which work together towards developing a common set of activities.

As a second stage, the Route has evolved as a series of tourist itineraries across different cities and territories of Europe, which would allow visitors to gain a more thorough understanding of Roma culture. The activities will be carried out in 2010 and include a remembrance of the Genocide of the Roma during WWII.

For a better understanding of the Route and its importance from a cultural and historical point of view, the following text edited by the Council of Europe is available:

Liégeois, J.-P. The Route of Roma Culture and Heritage. [There are translations into French and Romani]

European Parliament resolution on the occasion of International Roma Day – anti‑Gypsyism in Europe and EU recognition of the memorial day of the Roma genocide during World War II

On 2nd August 2015’s commemoration of the Genocide of the Roma, European Commission Vice-President Timmermans and Commissioner Jourova took the occasion to express the EC’s support for the EP resolution.

The International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) is an intergovernmental body whose purpose is to place political and social leaders’ support behind the need for Holocaust education, remembrance and research both nationally and internationally.

The International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) consists of representatives of government, as well as governmental and non-governmental organizations. Its purpose is to place political and social leaders’ support behind the need for Holocaust education, remembrance, and research both nationally and internationally. IHRA currently has 31 member countries, ten observer countries and seven Permanent International Partners.

This institution is committed to the Declaration of the Stockholm International Forum on the Holocaust.

The Alliance has also established specialised committees regarding antisemitism and Holocaust denial, the situation of the Roma, memorial sites, information projects, comparative genocide, and special challenges in Holocaust education. The IHRA is also in the process of implementing a Multi-Year Work Plan that focuses on killing sites, access to archives, educational research, and Holocaust Memorial Days.

On the three main committees that bring experts working on IHRA’s three principle areas of activity, one is dedicated to the Genocide of the Roma. This committee aims at raising awareness about the genocide of the Roma under National Socialism. It also encourages the inclusion of this genocide into school curricula. Its goal is to draw attention to the continuity of prejudices about Roma before, during and after the Second World War as well as to demonstrate the link between the history of discrimination and persecution and the present situation of the Roma. This calls for educational programs that combat stereotyping, that include a focus on Roma resistance rather than on a victim status, and that emphasize the resilience of Roma culture.

Therefore, the IHRA offers project grants regarding the the Genocide of the Roma. The work of the Committee includes supporting organizations with a focus on the Roma in the IHRA’s Grant Programme application process, raising visibility of the issue through outreach and networking, and by organizing a conference held in London in 2014.

In 2014 the Committee also initiated two research projects: an annotated bibliography of academic publications on the Genocide of the Roma, and an overview of international organisations working on the Genocide of the Roma and contemporary Roma-focused issues.

To get more information about the activities concerning Roma developed by the members, click here.

Conferences and workshops

The IHRA points out the importance of teaching about the Holocaust and, therefore, has organised several conferences and workshops about the topic. For instance, the Workshop “Roma Genocide Education” on the 14th of June 2008 (in Linz, Austria) or the “Holocaust Era Assets Conference” (Prague and Terezin, from 26th to 30th June 2009).

Among other subjects, the members covered the following themes: the history of the Roma before and during the Second World War, the construction of the memory since the end of the Second World War, and how can one institution make education tools and materials on these topics available.

10th – 11th June 2014: The IHRA Conference "The Genocide of the Roma" was held in London. The conference included:

  • keynote addresses by Dr. Slawomir Kapralski, Institute of Philosophy and Sociology of the Polish Academic of Sciences, Warsaw and Mirjam-Angela Karoly, OSCE’s Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR),
  • workshops led by colleagues from across Europe who will share teaching and learning materials suitable for classroom use, and
  • an expert round table discussion focusing on the connection between the historical past and the contemporary situation of the Roma.

Report on the conference

To get more information about the activities done in the last few years, click here.

Teaching materials

The IHRA shows on its education website several guidelines about the Holocaust education, including one concerning what to teach.

In partnership with OSCE and Yad Vashem: Preparing Holocaust Memorial Days: Suggestions for Educators, in 2006, published in many languages.

Gerhard Baumgartner edited in 2008 - for internal use only – Collected Case Studies. Workshop “Roma Genocide Education”, Linz, 14th of June 2008. The texts were drafted by specialists in the Samudaripen, for instance J. Barsony, G. Baumgartner, L. Gabcova, Z. Kumanova, M. Kelso and M. Schuster.

IHRA’s Education Working Group Paper, Holocaust and other Genocides, released in December 2010

 

Cultural activities

International Memorial Days take place every year in IHRA Member States: Overview of the Holocaust Memorial Days in the 31 Member States of IHRA (only on Jewish genocide)

Overview in the OSCE region

They also provide a memorials database.

 

 

Publications:

Kapralski, S. (2005). “Why Teach About the Romani Holocaust?”. In: Ambrosewicz-Jacobs, J. and Hońdo, L. (eds.). Why Should We Teach About the Holocaust?. Cracow: The Jagiellonian University, Institute of European Studies, pp. 82-92. [Second edition, expanded].

Mirga, A. (2005). “For a Worthy Place Among the Victims. The Holocaust and the Extermination of Roma During World War II”. In: Ambrosewicz-Jacobs, J. and Hońdo, L. (eds.). Why Should We Teach About the Holocaust?. Cracow: The Jagiellonian University, Institute of European Studies, pp. 93-100. [Second edition, expanded].

OSCE-ODIHR (ed.) (2006). Education on the Holocaust and on Anti-Semitism: An Overview and Analysis of Educational Approaches. Warsaw: OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights. [There is a translation into Russian].

OSCE-ODIHR and Yad Vashem (eds.) (2006). Preparing Holocaust Memorial Days: Suggestions for Educators. Warsaw: OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights. [There are translations into Croatian, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Lithuanian, Polish, Russian, Serbian and Spanish].

OSCE-ODIHR (ed.) (2008). Holocaust Memorial Days in the OSCE Region - An overview of good governmental practices. Warsaw: OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights.

OSCE-ODIHR (2015). Teaching about and Commemorating the Roma and Sinti Genocide: Practices within the OSCE Area. Warsaw, OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights.

Commemoration of the Roma and Sinti genocide:

On the occasion of the forthcoming commemoration of the Genocide of the Roma on 2 August, the director of the OSCE's Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights, Michael Georg Link, called for greater efforts to educate youth about the Roma genocide.

A seminar on “Educating about the Roma and Sinti genocide - Learning from the past to challenge present discrimination and promote equality”, in Stockholm, 23rd April 2015, was hosted jointly by the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR). Representatives from ODIHR’s Contact Point for Roma and Sinti Issues presented data gathered for a comprehensive report on the recognition and commemoration within the OSCE area of the Roma and Sinti genocide, to be published later this year and which will also highlight gaps in teaching and commemoration.